Minari

In theaters Feb. 12 and video on demand Feb. 26.

The Plot:

A Korean American family moves to a rural Arkansas farm in search of its own American dream. Trying to adapt to a new life, with its challenges and unfamiliar terrain, they learn how resilient they can be and what really makes a home.

Lynn's Take:

A gentle, intimate portrayal of an immigrant family struggling to adapt to a new life, “Minari” is a rare gem with a big, heart-tugging impact.

A semi-autobiographical journey about his childhood in Arkansas in the 1980s, writer-director Lee Isaac Chung has crafted a series of genuine remembered moments that resonate, especially from young son David’s point of view. The story may be slender but its sensitivity is significant.

As precocious David, Alan S. Kim stomps around in cowboy boots, soaking up everything as he drinks Mountain Dew and blurts out exactly how he feels and what he means. Kim is a natural, and watching how he looks at everything in a curious light is just one of the film’s many delights. He translates his emotions superbly.

At first, David has a testy relationship with his grandmother, Soonja (Youn Yuh-jong), his mom’s mother who has come over from Korea to live with them. But their relationship blossoms and their bond is tight — and neither has a filter.

Youn Yuh-jong delivers one of the best performances of the year as the grandma, whose love, strength and wisdom is a saving grace. She is also wickedly funny, providing welcome moments of comic relief.

In a poignant performance, Steven Yeun plays Jacob, who tries to hold on to his farm and his family in the face of great adversity. He moves them from California to the middle of nowhere because he wants more for them — and himself.

But his wife, Monica (Yeri Han), has a harder time and is frustrated that she is forced to fit into a life she is apprehensive about, and worries about everything. After all, David was born with a heart murmur and a hospital is miles away.

The fine ensemble sincerely draws us in to their heartbreaks, happiness and sorrows. Character actor Will Patton plays a Pentecostal neighbor who helps Jacob with the farm, and the character is based on Chung’s father’s friend.

“Minari” won both the Audience and the Grand Jury Awards at the 2020 Sundance Film Festival, and as a contender in the current awards season, audiences are discovering how relatable a film it is, which is in English subtitles for about half. The family is bilingual.

The production elements are also outstanding in helping to strike a universal chord, with lyrical cinematography by Lachlan Milne and crisp editing by Harry Yoon. Production designer Yong Ok Lee subtly creates the ‘80s home from a ramshackle trailer to a family of four’s personality within their economic means.

Composer Emile Mosseri’s beautiful score evokes youthful memories and warmth.

The film’s namesake, minari, also known as “water dropwort,” is a resilient plant with an herbal flavor, tasting like parsley. With its crisp stems and leafy tops, it can grow pretty much anywhere, and is sold as a vegetable in Korean markets. Its meaning is obvious.

With its poetic small moments, what the deeply personal “Minari” says about roots and family echoes with all of us.